“It’s a dog’s life and other problems”
Thomas Wedell-Wedellsborg interviewed by Peter Day

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Thomas Wedell-Wedellsborg is an expert on innovation and a critic of how many companies try to do it the wrong way; he is co-author of the book Innovation as Usual: How to Help Your People to Bring Great Ideas to Life. Originally from Denmark, he now lives in New York where he is working on a new project trying to improve the way that the world goes about tackling its problems. Thomas W-W talks about his ideas to Peter Day, and explains what he learnt about business problem-solving from a shelter for abandoned dogs in Los Angeles.

GPDF17 GROWTH AND INCLUSIVE PROSPERITY
by Mark Beliczky

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While the world has experienced an unprecedented period of economic growth for the past fifty years (positive annual GDP growth in 54 of 55 years since 1961), the global economic growth rate in terms of GDP and measured in decades is 31% lower today than it was in the 60’s. Also, it is important to note that the world GDP per capita has also declined 37% since the highs of 1960s. The challenge for business leaders in today’s slower/slowing growth period is to find ways to reverse the trend and to shift and propel their organization into growth mode. The growth engine can be stimulated and energized, not with real capital, but with a greater […]

Combating Transhumanism
by Sarah Spiekermann

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Inclusive prosperity builds on a positive and benevolent idea of man. But do we really uphold such a good-natured way of thinking about mankind if transhumanism paves its way into the elites? In June the Swiss Daily “Neue Züricher Zeitung” (NZZ) published the Anti-Transhumanist Manifesto that I completed together with a number of colleagues holding professorships in such diverse academic disciplines as psychology, business informatics, philosophy, architecture and theology. My stance has been supported from around the world for bringing the topic to the fore: that a select group of positivistic scientists are promoting an idea of man that is not only false, but also incredibly dangerous in times of accelerating technological advance.   What […]

“Booms and busts”
Carlota Perez interviewed by Peter Day (Part I)

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  Professor Carlota Perez takes the long view of economics..the very long view. Her particular field of interest is long cycles stretching out 50 years or more, and often starting with the shock of big technology changes. She teaches at the London School of Economics, the University of Sussex, Tallinn University of Technology and University College London, and she has written a much-praised book: “Technological Revolutions and Financial Capital: the Dynamics of Bubbles and Golden Ages”. In this first podcast, she tells Peter Day about the economic cycle we are now in the middle of … and how it’s similar to (and different from) previous big cycles which are not really understood by business people, […]

Purpose Parasites
by Kenneth Mikkelsen

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A company has to be something. It has to matter. In a connected, network era, leadership is exerted in a 360-degree social, global and ethical context. Increasingly, companies are asked to take a stand to stay relevant and trustworthy in the eyes of its stakeholders. This involves engaging in a larger conversation about why it exists and how it affects people’s lives and society at large. There is a growing focus on purpose in organisations. More and more companies say they are trying to change the world for the better. It has become somewhat fashionable for leading organisations to blow their own trumpets and wave purpose flags from their glass and steel buildings. One session at this year’s World […]

“Stay healthy in the networked world”
Julia Hobsbawm interviewed by Peter Day

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Julia Hobsbawm says we are drowning in data and deadlines, and we need to correct the balance between the personal and the always-on networked world that has rapidly become the way that most of us live. Julia Hobsbawm was the world’s first professor of networking (at the Cass Business School in London), and she’s the founder of the knowledge networking firm Editorial Intelligence. She talks to Peter Day about the ideas in her new book “Fully Connected: Surviving and Thriving in an Age of Overload”.

A Magna Carta for Inclusivity and Fairness in the Global AI Economy*
by Olaf Groth PhD, Mark Nitzberg PhD and Mark Esposito PhD

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* adapted from the forthcoming book “Solomon’s Code: Power and Ethics in the AI Revolution” (working title) copyright © 2017 Olaf Groth & Mark Nitzberg. We stand at a watershed moment for society’s vast, unknown digital future.  A powerful technology, artificial intelligence (AI), has emerged from its own ashes, thanks largely to advances in neural networks modeled loosely on the human brain.  AI can find patterns in massive unstructured data sets, improve performance as more data becomes available, identify objects quickly and accurately, and, make ever more and better recommendations and decision-making, while minimizing interference from complicated, political humans.  This raises major questions about the degree of human choice and inclusion for the decades to […]