Incubating Entrepreneurialism
by Piero Formica & Nick Hixson

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in 10th Global Peter Drucker Forum

Defining the new entrepreneurship: how it’s different from the current one A gap between entrepreneurship and art has arisen over past industrial revolutions. New entrepreneurship aims to close the gap. It is imbued with entrepreneurialism, transplanting into the socio-economic sphere Brunelleschi’s Renaissance perspective in the art world. Current entrepreneurship is in the STEM field, following the Fordist production environment, characterised by the bureaucracy of the 20th century. Know How To Do now has to be Knowing How To Think, Imagine and Understand. This requires familiarity with the Arts. STEM changes to STEAM. In the new entrepreneurship mode, innovationists take over from incrementalists. Digitisation joins science and engineering with design and arts, enabling creativity in human-centred […]

The Death of the Manager: The Rise of the Enabler
by Nick Hixson

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in 10th Global Peter Drucker Forum

Management is about controlling, administering, and planning. It is a centuries old discipline derived from the need to control a predictable process based on production where the parameters of the market and environment move slowly. It came to its peak in the last century with the rise of the machine. Machines fed the management mindset of control and predictability, and most fluctuations in desired results were put down to the problem of having to employ people to operate the machines. People are not machines Huge amounts of effort have been expended in trying to control the unpredictability of people and make them more like machines. Latterly, there has been a realisation that people don’t function […]

Want to scale? Don’t copy the big companies
by Nick Hixson

Posted on 2 CommentsPosted in 10th Global Peter Drucker Forum

Why does it seem that the big corporations always get away with it? How do they sleep at night, given some of the missteps causing such problems to the rest of us? Not our problem It seems like it’s no-one’s problem, always somewhere to pass it up/along/down the line so there’s no individual responsibility. Hence no action until a customer gets a real problem. The latest example is BMW’s delay in making a product recall on some of its cars, although knowing the electrical system could completely fail at any time. Someone has now died, and while the problem was identified by BMW (and the UK’s Driver and Vehicle Safety Agency) no-one took action. Reports […]

What do we mean by entrepreneur? Broadening the term.
by Nick Hixson

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in 8th Global Peter Drucker Forum

The word is overused and misused. I’ve already commented after the last Forum that a session used entrepreneurs and their impact as being the answer to many of our ills, which is at best unlikely. The great majority of businesses have little entrepreneurial characteristics but still should have a valuable place in a modern society. My empirical data, from 30+ years of working with UK SMEs divides business owners into 4 main groups: Type Description Percentage of Businesses Survivors Low income goals, not risk takers, poor management capabilities and poor decision takers. Hungry for advice, seldom implement. 50 Low Growth (LG) Significant income ambition. Potential limited by control. Superb doers, risk-oriented. Poor people managers and […]

Entrepreneurs are self-centred
by Nick Hixson

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in 7th Global Peter Drucker Forum

A reflection on some aspects of the Global Drucker Forum 2015, with thoughts pertaining to the 2016 Forum theme: The Entrepreneurial Society   …by which I mean they have self-belief, self-control, and self-actualisation.   But they’re not the solution to rising unemployment caused by the rise of machines. We heard a lot at the recent Drucker Forum about the rise of machines, and how natural monopolies are being eliminated as competitive advantages erode quicker. Stability is not normal any more.   So we can plan our societies for reducing levels of employment, and find things for people to fill their time with, together with a socially inclusive way of allowing them to fulfil their needs […]

MANAGING IN THE DIGITAL AGE
by Nick Hixson, Drucker blog moderator

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in 7th Global Peter Drucker Forum

IN AN AGE OF INCREASING DIGITALISATION AND AUTOMATION WHERE DO MANAGERS FIT INTO THE WORKFORCE, AND HOW WILL MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES HAVE TO ADAPT TO THE NEW WORKING LANDSCAPE?   So are we managing, or just coping, in the fast-emerging digital age?   Bloggers have brought visions of dystopic societies where we are ruled by machines; worries concerning the disenfranchisement of vast swathes of the workforce when machines take away jobs; and questions regarding how developing countries may suffer most from the loss of low skilled jobs to autonomous contraptions.   These are reasonable concerns, and mirror the worries that many had during the rise of the Industrial Age, with Victorian machines changing the face of the countryside; […]

Opportunity missed? People should be valued for their own sake, not just as assets
by Nick Hixson

Posted on 2 CommentsPosted in 6th Global Peter Drucker Forum

I listened and spoke to a lot of the leading management thinkers in the world at the Drucker Forum. Everybody is pretty much in agreement that we need to sort out our economies and to do that we need to have meaningful work to enable everybody’s full potential and capacity to be realised for their individual good as well as their employers, the economy and society generally. As always with this high-level thinking, there’s plenty of good research and evidence to support it, and some examples in real life companies, and that number of companies is growing. I had some input into one of the Creative Economy posts published on the Forbes website presented at […]